Wednesday September 4th, 2013 informationliberation.com
Cops Hold Children At Gunpoint For Climbing On School Roof, Rough Them Up, Arrest Them, School Defends Actions (InformationLiberation)

When three middle schoolers climbed on top of the roof at their local middle school during off hours, they didn't think they'd end up stuck up at gunpoint by police officers aiming assault rifles at them ordering them to submit, but that's just what happened at Port Charlotte Middle school in southwest Florida.

Mike Riley, Charlotte County Public Schools Spokesperson justified the police's response by saying the children "knew they shouldn't have" climbed on the roof, "I don't care if they're in kindergarten or if they're seniors in high school, they know the rules."

"I really can't speak for law enforcement, but with the incident that happened, the murder of Sergeant Wilson, I'm sure when those guys respond to a call that there are three individuals on a roof of a school, they're nervous when they get there now."

Indeed, that same "nervousness" is what drove Officer Daniel Alvarado of San Antonio’s Northside Independent School District Police to shoot and kill 14-year-old Derek Lopez after he got in a scuffle with a fellow student, Derek fled from the cop rather than submit, and he paid for it with his life after Alvarado gunned him down out of "fear for [his] own safety."



That same nervousness is no doubt what drove this unnamed cop's actions in a recent incident out of Aurora, Colorado in which cops shut down a road searching for a bank robber. They ordered everyone out of their cars one by one and held them at gunpoint, video from the local news showed a police officer with a shotgun sticking up a child with his finger ready to pull the trigger.



Rule number one of gun safety is never point your gun at something you don't intend to shoot. I guess if you're a cop and you're "nervous" everyone is fair game. No wonder Antonio Buehler says cops are cowards.
_
Chris runs the website InformationLiberation.com, you can read more of his writings here. Follow infolib on twitter here.