Wednesday June 19th, 2013 informationliberation.com
Public Outcry In Taiwan Kills Their Version Of SOPA (Techdirt)
At the end of May, we wrote about the Taiwanese government's bizarre proposal to create a copyright bill that was like SOPA, but even worse. Apparently, the folks at the Taiwan Intellectual Property Office (IPO) had slept through the whole SOPA thing. Thankfully, the Taiwanese quickly did their own version of the SOPA blackout, with Wikipedia Taiwan and Mozilla Taiwan set to participate. However, seeing the writing on the wall (and, perhaps, someone showed the IPO folks what happened in the US), and the proposal was abandoned before the protest was even needed.

Of course, it's not completely over:
In the face of these criticisms and the planned blackout, the Taiwan Intellectual Property Office abandoned this severe copyright law. In its announcement, the office stated that this plan would be ďadjusted.Ē Itís clear that the government intends to introduce another copyright enforcement initiative in the future. Still, itís enormously encouraging to see how users in Taiwan have organized to defend their rights and successfully stopped this draconian blacklist law.

The unfortunate reality is that many government authorities around the world still buy into the belief that the health of the Internet is acceptable collateral damage in this manufactured war on copyright infringement. Lawmakers need to understand that creativity and innovation can only thrive when our platforms remain open, where users are free to share and experiment with content. While itís clear that the Taiwan Intellectual Property Office did not learn from the mistakes of SOPA and PIPA in the U.S., letís hope others see the defeat of this latest copyright blacklist law and recognize that users will not put up with efforts to censor the Internet.
Still, it is good to see that whenever something SOPA-like pops up, the public quickly jumps up to protest it.