Thursday June 9th, 2011 informationliberation.com
Anarchy in India (Stephan Kinsella)
As Roderick Long notes on his blog, the NYTimes has an interesting article up about the Indian city of Gurgaon, which has flourished under a relative lack of government, despite its lack of natural resources:
Before it had malls, a theme park and fancy housing compounds ... Gurgaon was widely regarded as an economic wasteland. In 1979, the state of Haryana created Gurgaon by dividing a longstanding political district on the outskirts of New Delhi. One half would revolve around the city of Faridabad, which had an active municipal government, direct rail access to the capital, fertile farmland and a strong industrial base. The other half, Gurgaon, had rocky soil, no local government, no railway link and almost no industrial base.

As an economic competition, it seemed an unfair fight. And it has been: Gurgaon has won, easily. Faridabad has struggled to catch India's modernization wave, while Gurgaon's disadvantages turned out to be advantages, none more important, initially, than the absence of a districtwide government, which meant less red tape capable of choking development. ...

Meanwhile, with Gurgaon's understaffed police force outmatched by such a rapidly growing population, some law-and-order responsibilities have been delegated to the private sector. Nearly 12,000 private security guards work in Gurgaon, and many are pressed into directing traffic on major streets. ...
As my friend Dan Coleman observed, regarding this article, “One of those few times you get a side-by-side experiment. If a rocky, useless, small town without resources can explode like this, it makes one wonder what the US could be like . . .”

Other side-by-side experiments would include the dramatic difference between North and South Korea, East and West Germany (see Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s great De-Socialization in a United Germany), and perhaps Hong Kong versus Red China. And, hopefully, someday, Texas versus the USA.