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Article posted Aug 14 2013, 4:51 AM Category: Big Brother/Orwellian Source: Democracy Now! Print

Owner of Snowden's Email Service on Why He Closed Lavabit Rather Than Comply With Gov't



Lavabit, an encrypted email service believed to have been used by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, has abruptly shut down. The move came amidst a legal fight that appeared to involve U.S. government attempts to win access to customer information. In a Democracy Now! broadcast exclusive, we are joined by Lavabit owner Ladar Levison and his lawyer, Jesse Binnall. "Unfortunately, I canít talk about it. I would like to, believe me," Levison says. "I think if the American public knew what our government was doing, they wouldnít be allowed to do it anymore." In a message to his customers last week, Levison said: "I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people, or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit." Levison said he was barred from discussing the events over the past six weeks that led to his decision. Soon after, another secure email provider called Silent Circle also announced it was shutting down.

Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AARON MAT…: We turn now to the news an encrypted email service believed to have been used by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden has abruptly shut down. The move came amidst a legal fight that appeared to involve U.S. government attempts to win access to customer information.

The owner of Lavabit, Ladar Levison, wrote a message online saying, quote, "I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people, or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit." Ladar Levison said he was barred from discussing the events over the past six weeks that led to his decision.

He went on to write, quote, "This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would strongly recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States."

Later on Thursday, another secure email provider called Silent Circle also announced it was shutting down.

AMY GOODMAN: Now, in a Democracy Now! broadcast exclusive, we go to Washington, D.C., where weíre joined by Ladar Levison, founder, owner and operator of Lavabit. Weíre also joined by his lawyer, Jesse Binnall.

We welcome you both to Democracy Now! Ladar Levison, letís begin with you. Explain the decision you made.

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah, well, Iíve--thank you, Amy. Iíve compared the decision to that of, you know, putting a beloved pet to sleep, you know, faced with the choice of watching it suffer or putting it to sleep quietly. It was a very difficult decision. But I felt that in the end I had to pick between the lesser of two evils and that shutting down the service, if it was no longer secure, was the better option. It was, in effect, the lesser of the two evils.

AMY GOODMAN: What are you facing? When you say "the lesser of two evils," what was the other choice?

LADAR LEVISON: Unfortunately, I canít talk about that. I would like to, believe me. I think if the American public knew what our government was doing, they wouldnít be allowed to do it anymore, which is why Iím here in D.C. today speaking to you. My hope is that, you know, the media can uncover whatís going on, without my assistance, and, you know, sort of pressure both Congress and our efforts through the court system to, in effect, put a cap on what it is the government is entitled to in terms of our private communications.

AARON MAT…: For those who arenít familiar with what encrypted email is, can you walk us through that and talk about what your service provided?

LADAR LEVISON: Certainly. You know, Iíve always liked to say my service was by geeks, for geeks. Itís grown up over the last 10 years, itís sort of settled itself into serving those that are very privacy-conscious and security-focused. We offered secure access via high-grade encryption. And at least for our paid users, not for our free accounts--I think thatís an important distinction--we offered secure storage, where incoming emails were stored in such a way that they could only be accessed with the userís password, so that, you know, even myself couldnít retrieve those emails. And thatís what we meant by encrypted email. Thatís a term thatís sort of been thrown around because there are so many different standards for encryption, but in our case it was encrypted in secure storage, because, as a third party, you know, I didnít want to be put in a situation where I had to turn over private information. I just didnít have it. I didnít have access to it. And that was sort of--may have been the situation that I was facing. You know, obviously, I canít speak to the details of any specific case, but--Iíll just leave it at that.

AMY GOODMAN: NSA leaker Edward Snowden recently described your decision to shut down Lavabit as, quote, "inspiring." He told The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald, quote, "America cannot succeed as a country where individuals like Mr. Levison have to relocate their businesses abroad to be successful. Employees and leaders at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, Apple, and the rest of our internet titans must ask themselves why they aren't fighting for our interests the same way small businesses are. The defense they have offered to this point is that they were compelled by laws they do not agree with, but one day of downtime for the coalition of their services could achieve what a hundred Lavabits could not."

Snowden went on to say, quote, "When Congress returns to session in September, let us take note of whether the internet industryís statements and lobbyists--which were invisible in the lead-up to the Conyers-Amash vote--emerge on the side of the Free Internet or the NSA and its Intelligence Committees in Congress."

Ladar, you were the service provider for Edward Snowden?

LADAR LEVISON: I believe thatís correct. Obviously, I didnít know him personally, but itís been widely reported, and there was an email account bearing his name on my system, as Iíve been made well aware of recently.

AMY GOODMAN: Glenn Greenwald also wrote, "What is particularly creepy about the Lavabit self-shutdown is that the company is gagged by law even from discussing the legal challenges it has mounted and the court proceeding it has engaged. In other words, the American owner of the company believes his Constitutional rights and those of his customers are being violated by the US Government, but he is not allowed to talk about it."

Greenwald goes on to write, quote, "Just as is true for people who receive National Security Letters under the Patriot Act, Lavabit has been told [that] they would face serious criminal sanctions if they publicly discuss what is being done to their company."

Ladar Levison, why did you start Lavabit?

LADAR LEVISON: Well, just to add one thing to Greenwaldís comments, I mean, thereís information that I canít even share with my lawyer, let alone with the American public. So if weíre talking about secrecy, you know, itís really been taken to the extreme. And I think itís really being used by the current administration to cover up tactics that they may be ashamed of.

But just to answer your question, why did I start Lavabit? It was right out of college. I was sitting around with a group of my friends. I owned the domain name nerdshack.com, and we thought it would be cool to offer, you know, a free private email with a large quota, just like Gmail, and we sort of built the service along those lines. And as I was designing and developing the custom platform, it was right around when the PATRIOT Act came out. And thatís really what colored my opinion and my philosophy, and why I chose to take the extra effort and build in the secure storage features and sort of focus on the privacy niche and the security focus niche. And itís really grown up from there. Weíve seen a lot of demand for, you know, people who want email but donít necessarily want it lumped in and profiled along with their searches or their browsing history or any of their other Internet activities. And thatís really where weíve focused and really how weíve grown over the years, up to when I shut down 410,000 registered users.

AARON MAT…: And, Ladar, during this time, youíve complied with other government subpoenas. Is that correct?

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah, weíve probably had at least two dozen subpoenas over the last 10 years, from local sheriffsí offices all the way up to federal courts. And obviously I canít speak to any particular one, but weíve always complied with them. I think itís important to note that, you know, Iíve always complied with the law. Itís just in this particular case I felt that complying with the law--

JESSE BINNALL: And we do have to be careful at this point.

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah, I--

JESSE BINNALL: But I think he can speak philosophically about the--his philosophy behind Lavabit and why it would lead to his decision to shut down.

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah, I have--

AMY GOODMAN: Thatís Jesse Binnall, by the way. And, Jesse, how difficult is this for Ladar Levison, what he can say, what he canít say? How high are the stakes here?

JESSE BINNALL: The stakes are very high. Itís a very unfortunate situation that, as Americans, we really are not supposed to have to worry about. But Ladar is in a situation where he has to watch every word he says when heís talking to the press, for fear of being imprisoned. And we canít even talk about what the legal requirements are that make it so he has to watch his words. But the simple fact is, Iím really here with him only because there are some very fine lines that he canít cross, for fear of being dragged away in handcuffs. And thatís pretty much the exact fears that led the founders to give us the First Amendment in the first place. So itís high stakes.

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah.

AARON MAT…: And, Ladar, in your letter, you write that "A favorable decision would allow me to resurrect Lavabit as an American company." So, are you suggesting perhaps that you would consider moving it abroad?

LADAR LEVISON: I donít think I can continue to run Lavabit abroad as an American citizen. I would have to move abroad, effectively, to administer the service. As an American citizen, Iím still subject to the laws and jurisdiction of the United States, particularly as long as I continue to live here. You know, thatís why I have a lot of respect for Snowden, because he gave up his entire life, the life that heís known his entire life, so that he could speak out. I havenít gotten to that point. I still hope that itís possible to run a private service, private cloud data service, here in the United States without necessarily being forced to conduct surveillance on your users by the American government.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you say, Ladar, if youíve received a national security letter?

LADAR LEVISON: No.

JESSE BINNALL: Unfortunately, he canít.

AMY GOODMAN: Weíre going to talk about that in a minute, the overall issue of what these are, for listeners and viewers who are not familiar with this. But, Ladar Levison, soon after you pulled the plug on Lavabit, another encrypted email provider called Silent Circle also shut down. Mike Janke, Silent Circleís CEO and co-founder, said, quote, "There was no 12-hour heads up. If we announced it, it would have given authorities time to file a national security letter. We decided to destroy it before we were asked to turn (information) over. We had to do scorched earth." Ladar, your response?

LADAR LEVISON: I can certainly understand his position. If the government had learned that I was shutting my service down--can I say that?

JESSE BINNALL: Well, I think itís best to kind of avoid that topic, unfortunately. But I think it is fair to say that Silent Circle was probably in a very different situation than Lavabit was, and which is probably why they took the steps that they did, which I think were admirable.

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah. But I will say that I donít think I had a choice but to shut it down without notice. I felt that was my only option. And Iíll have to leave it to your listeners to understand why. But itís important to note that, you know, Lavabit wasnít the first service provider to receive a government request, and weíre not the first service provider to fight it. Weíre just the first service provider to take a different approach. And it could very well be because of our size that we have that option. Weíre wholly focused on secure email. Without it, we have no business. You take a much larger provider with a greater number of employees, and shutting down a major section of their company, when they have to answer to shareholders, may not be a viable option.

AMY GOODMAN: Why have you decided to speak out today, Ladar?

LADAR LEVISON: Because my biggest fear when I shut down the service was that no good would come of it. And Iím hoping that by speaking out, I can prompt, hopefully, Congress to act and change the laws that put me in this circumstance to begin with. I know thatís a little ironic, considering I canít speak about the specific laws that put me in this position, but, you know, thereís a real need in this country to establish what the rights are of our cloud providers. And unless we take actions to ensure that, you know, we can continue to operate secure, private services, I think weíre going to lose a lot of business over the next few years. And I think all the major providers, not just Lavabit, have gone on record to say the same.

AMY GOODMAN: Do you think people should use email?

LADAR LEVISON: Yeah, I think itís a great way to communicate. I think weíre entering a world where we have any number of ways of communicating, from postal mail to Twitter, to text messaging, to Facebook, to instant messenger, to email, to telephone, to video chat. They all kind of blend together. They all sort of fit their own niche, their own purpose. And I think email still has a very important role to play in communication between people.

AMY GOODMAN: Should we just assume itís all being read?

LADAR LEVISON: I think you should assume any communication that is electronic is being monitored.

AMY GOODMAN: Weíre going to break and then come back to our discussion. And weíll be joined by a service provider who did get a national security letter and is now able to talk about it. Weíve been speaking with Ladar Levison, Lavabit owner, who just shut down the--as a service provider, provided services to Edward Snowden; and Jesse Binnall, his lawyer. Weíll be back in a minute.





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Comments 1 - 7 of 7 Add Comment Page 1 of 1
Anonymous

Posted: Aug 14 2013, 8:00 AM

Link
71213 Use BitMessage. There is not provider.
Anonymous

Posted: Aug 14 2013, 8:13 PM

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1729 Mr. Levison,

By all means, move abroad and continue your fine service.

FUCK THE US!

Please remember, there's NOTHING noble about being a "citizen."
"Citizen" is just a friendly sounding word for SLAVE.
Anonymous

Posted: Aug 14 2013, 8:26 PM

Link
1729 Hey, Amy,

THIS is your treasured "democracy" at work.

"Democracy Now?"

DEMOCRCACY NEVER!!!!!

Anonymous

Posted: Aug 15 2013, 3:00 AM

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12169 Ladar,
move to another country for a bit,
renounce your citizenship here so you're not under this sick evil during that time,
and start up a new email service the way you want it to run.

myself and a lot of other people are going to take the country back, by force.
i won't be around after that but there will be a lot of intelligent good people here who will, and they will be happy to invite you back if you wish to come back.

this will take a few years but not too many, i'm guestimating 3 to 5 for the war, so in under a decade you should be able to move home again if you choose.

God bless.

- -
note to others:

it's not okay before God to be a fence-sitter,

but it is okay to be a peacenik,
although such action is not "successful" when faced with heinous violence, it does have a value, to humans and to God. speaking out non-violently is witnessing before God, and you're doing the right thing.

God has made some to be harkers, some to be scribes, and some to do physical battle. it takes courage to accept and perform your role regardless which of those roles it is.
civilunrest

Posted: Aug 19 2013, 3:27 PM

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98236 Given what i know about corruption in the state and federal court system, i'm totally agreement that we need to take this country back by force if necessary. I myself will pop a cap in a pig's head with glee.
L.S.

Posted: Aug 20 2013, 1:11 AM

Link
hey, i like anonymous 1729.

"FUCK THE US!" i wish he would have typed "USA," though, they might like that.

@nonymous 12169: "God bless." that phrase gives me reason to pause, as does your comment.

Levison's "god"..... is it that god, who you would like to bless him? and 3-5 years... how did you come up with that figure? databases nowadays, go back much further. even if you were thinking of the older ones, which went back 7 years, that still wouldn't stand to reason, that you've figured only 3-5.

"God has made some to be harkers, [perhaps, even "hakers"] some to be scribes, and some to do physical battle." - 12169

mercury, Zeus's daughters, and mars... it's strange to me that you've ascribed those gifts as coming from only 1 god, or, should i say: "lord." THE MOST HIGH wouldn't have human beings killing one another; that's Chaos, "the sun god," who would require human sacrifice; (oops, I've named our government's god.) though, that's oldspeak.

the government's goal is "eternal life." The Most High's laws are universal and inherent, not, granted by government's with centuries of accumulated knowledge, pertaining to quantum mechanics. an idea can live forever, can take you back in time, can keep you running in circles... to break free, just think ahead - to something greater; ("they" don't this ability.)

DiseŮo web reus

Posted: Sep 30 2013, 4:24 AM

Link
17739 Estoy encantado de encontrar blogs donde leer informacion tan necesaria como esta. Gracias por poner este articulo.

Saludos

DiseŮo web reus http://www.granota.net/index.php/servicios/diseno-web-tarragona.html
Comments 1 - 7 of 7 Page 1 of 1


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