informationliberation
The news you're not supposed to know...




An Introduction to Austrian Economics: Understand Economics, Understand Everything
The Century of the Self: The Untold History of Controlling the Masses Through the Manipulation of Unconscious Desires
The Disappearing Male: From Virility to Sterility

The Obama Deception: The Mask Comes Off
Operation Gladio: The Hidden History of U.S. Sponsored False Flag Terrorism in EuropeThe New American Century: The Untold History of The Project for the New American Century
(more)
Article posted Dec 01 2011, 6:33 AM Category: Big Brother/Orwellian Source: EFF.org Print

House Committee Rushing to Approve Dangerous "Information Sharing" Bill

Proposal Would Gut Privacy Laws, Allow Unprecedented Data-Grab by Government
By Kevin Bankston and Lee Tien


We're for better network, computer, and device security. Unfortunately, "cybersecurity" bills often go off track--case in point: the " Internet kill switch. " The latest example comes courtesy of the leaders of the House Intelligence Committee. Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and ranking member Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) are introducing "The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011"(PDF).

The bill would allow a broad swath of ISPs and other private entities to "use cybersecurity systems" to collect and share masses of user data with the government, other businesses, or "any other entity" so long as it's for a vaguely-defined "cybersecurity purpose." It would trump existing privacy statutes that strictly limit the interception and disclosure of your private communications data, as well as any other state or federal law that might get in the way. Indeed, the language may be broad enough to bless the covert use of spyware if done in "good faith" for a "cybersecurity purpose."

This broad data-sharing between companies wouldn't be subject to any oversight or transparency measures (users can't restrict companies' sharing), while the only oversight for sharing with the federal government, ironically, would be through the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board--which hasn't existed since January 2008.

Worse yet, the bill doesn't limit what the federal government can do with the data or private communications that ISPs and others hand over, except to say that it can't be used for "regulatory" purposes--apparently it can be used for law enforcement and intelligence targeting purposes.

Based on how this proposal diverges from the White House's own cybersecurity proposal from May 12, we hope and expect that the Administration isn't happy with this House Intelligence bill for several reasons--insufficient privacy protections, lack of oversight, skepticism about efficacy. Perhaps at the top of the list is concern over the fact that the bill allows information sharing with any federal agency--including the National Security Agency (NSA)--thereby threatening civilian control of domestic cybersecurity efforts. As Rod Beckstrom, former Director of DHS's National Cybersecurity Center, said when he resigned in March 2009:
"NSA currently dominates most national cyber efforts". I believe this is a bad strategy... The intelligence culture is very different from a network operations or a security culture [and] the threats to our democratic processes are significant if all top level government network security and monitoring are handled by any one organization (either directly or indirectly).
Considering how greatly this bill would change the law and cybersecurity policy generally, the timing is especially shocking: the bill, introduced today, was only shown to privacy advocates such as EFF yesterday, and yet the Committee intends to "mark-up" and vote on whether to recommend passage of the bill TOMORROW.

Lawmakers should not rush to approve such a broad expansion of government power to obtain private information about its citizens without so much as a hearing on the bill. EFF flatly opposes this bill, and urges House Intelligence Committee members to oppose the bill and support any amendments to make it more privacy-protective if and when the Committee considers the proposal tomorrow. Eviscerating our online privacy protections won't strengthen our cybersecurity, it will only undermine it.





Latest Big Brother/Orwellian
- Bill Aimed At Shutting Off NSA's Water Starts Moving Forward Again
- Baltimore Prosecutors Withdraw Evidence Rather Than Talk About Police Department's Stingray Usage
- Detekt: A New Malware Detection Tool That Can Expose Illegitimate State Surveillance
- 2nd Grader's Homework Teaches 'The Government GIVES Us Our Rights'
- Feds Put Fake Cell Towers On Planes, Spied On Tons Of Innocent Americans
- Terrorists Used False DMCA Claims To Get Personal Data of Anti-Islamic Youtuber
- Court Says By Agreeing To AOL's Terms Of Service, You've 'Consented' To Search By Law Enforcement
- To Nobody's Surprise, Australian "Terrorism" Law May Be Used for Copyright Enforcement









No Comments Posted Add Comment


Add Comment
Name
Comment

* No HTML


Verification *
Please Enter the Verification Code Seen Below
 


PLEASE NOTE
Please see our About Page, our Disclaimer, and our Comments Policy.


FAIR USE NOTICE
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which in some cases has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available for the purposes of news reporting, education, research, comment, and criticism, which constitutes a 'fair use' of such copyrighted material in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. It is our policy to respond to notices of alleged infringement that comply with the DMCA and other applicable intellectual property laws. It is our policy to remove material from public view that we believe in good faith to be copyrighted material that has been illegally copied and distributed by any of our members or users.

About Us - Disclaimer - Privacy Policy



Advanced Search
Username:

Password:

Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Register

It's "An Extortion Racket:" Police Chief Moved to Tears After Exposing Corruption in His Department - 11/25Good Samaritan Hands Lost Purse To Cop, Cop Steals Cash Before Returning - 11/25Albuquerque Cop Who Killed Homeless Man Will Retire With Full Benefits - 11/25This is What a High School Football Game Looks Like In a Police State - 11/21This Minnesota Mom is Facing 2 Years in Jail for Saving Her Son's Life - 11/25Cop Keeps Job After First DUI, Now He's Being Charged With A Second - 11/25Darren Wilson and the Protocols of Official Exoneration - 11/25Why Does The Media Ignore Straightforward Police Executions? - 11/24

Rialto, CA Police Made to Wear Cameras, Use of Force Drops by Over Two-ThirdsCop Who Karate Chopped NY Judge In Throat Gets Off Scot-FreeFlorida Cop Smashes Compliant Woman's Face Into Car -- "Maybe Now You Can Understand Simple Instructions"VIDEO: Lapel Cam Reveals A Day In The Life Of A U.S. Police Officer (Tasing, Beating, Breaking & Entering, Stomping On Heads... and Laughing About It)Caught On Tape: Officer Sucker Punches Inmate In Face, Files Report Claiming 'Self Defense'Insult Person On Twitter, Go To JailSWAT Team Brings TV Crew To Film Raid Against Threatening Internet Critic -- Raids Innocent Grandma InsteadCop Karate Chops NY Judge In The Throat
(more)

 
Top